British Coin Cufflinks

The British farthing (¼d) coin was a fraction (one quarter) of a penny, or one nine hundred and sixtieth of a pound sterling. It was minted in bronze, and replaced the earlier copper farthings. It was used during the reign of six monarchs: Victoria, Edward VII, George V, Edward VIII, George VI and Elizabeth II, ceasing to be legal tender in 1960.

It featured two different designs on its reverse during its one hundred years in circulation: from 1860 until 1936, the image of Britannia; and from 1937 onwards, the image of a wren (below).

British Farthings (E7 to E2)

  •  Farthings
    • Edward VII (1902-10)
      • €75 / pair
    • George V (1911-36)
      • €55 / pair
    • George VI (1937-52)
      • €45 / pair
    • Elizabeth II (1953-56)
      • €45 / pair

The three pence coin – expressed in writing as “3d” – first appeared in England during the fine silver coinage of King Edward VI (1547–53).

The reign of King George V (1910–1936) features several changes to the threepence denomination. As with all British silver coins, the silver content was gradually reduced from 92.5% (sterling silver) to 50% silver over time.

  • 1920 – reduced to 50% silver, 40% copper, 10% nickel in 1920,
  • 1922 – alloy changed to 50% silver, 50% copper
  • 1927 – alloy changed to 50% silver, 40% copper, 5% nickel, 5% zinc

The design of the reverse of the circulating threepence (but not the Maundy threepence) was completely changed in 1927 to three oak sprigs with three acorns and a “G” in the centre, and the inscription THREE PENCE.

British Silver Threepence (E7 to G6).jpg

  • Silver Threepences
    • Edward VII (1902-10)
      • €75 / pair
    • George V (1911-36)
      • €65 / pair
    • George VI (1937-46)
      • €55 / pair

The sixpence (6d), sometimes known as a tanner, was a coin worth one-fortieth of a pound sterling, or six pence. It was first minted in the reign of Edward VI and circulated until 1971.

It saw similar reductions in its silver content to the silver threepence during the reign of George V and ceased to have any silver content from 1947, although the older silver coins continued to circulate.

A silver sixpence in the bride’s shoe is a traditional good luck wedding gesture, and customarily it is the father of the bride who places the sixpence as a token of him wishing her prosperity, love and happiness in her marriage.

British Silver Sixpence (E7 to G6).jpg

  • Silver Sixpences
    • Edward VII (1902-10)
      • €75 / pair
    • George V (1911-36)
      • €65 / pair
    • George VI (1937-46)
      • €55 / pair

British Sixpence (G6 to E2).jpg

  • Cupro-Nickel Sixpences
    • George VI (1947-52)
      • €45 / pair
    • Elizabeth II (1953-67)
      • €45 / pair

 

 

  1. email us at: numis.cufflinks@gmail.com
  2. please state the coin + year that you require

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